Tuesday, January 5, 2010

Shout Outs

Grand rounds founder Nick Genes, Blogborygmi,  is this week's host of Grand Rounds. You can read this week’s edition here.

Welcome to Grand Rounds,…This is the 327th edition of Grand Rounds, and navigating web is pretty different compared to when I first hosted. I've been stubbornly resisting social media to help spread the word about each week's location for Grand Rounds, figuring quality writing will find a way to reach interested readers. But when you consider that the Grand Rounds community of patients, providers and pundits is its own kind of social network, it only makes sense to adopt these new tools.

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 Joshua Schwimmer shared this on Facebook:  “Historic scientific books now available on the Web” with a link to

SCOPE - Stanford University School of Medicine

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has made six historic science books available on the Web in high resolution. The browsing experience is fairly good and the books are fascinating to look at. According ...

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Literature, Arts and Medicine Blog has a very nice post on medical writers, specifically nurses:  Remember The Nurses  (photo credit)

…Now name three nurse authors, who are either writing today or are part of the literary canon.
All right, I'll give you twenty-four hours to get back to me……

Though nurses' styles of self-expression differed widely, they wrote about their patients with a singular degree of material specificity, and they resisted surgeons' tendency to blur patients' individual characteristics. In their letters and diaries, they referred to patients by name, frequently mentioning hometowns, culinary tastes, or other distinguishing details. Often they quoted their conversations with soldiers, which surgeons who kept diaries rarely did. . . Surgeons' diaries do not show nearly the same individualization of suffering. They were more likely to refer to their patients in the abstract or to refer to the clinical details of a particular treatment without mentioning the soldier's name at all……….

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From Teen Imperium >> Teen Chat: 4 Steps To Have A Great Body Image

If we were to do a survey that asked how many of us feel happy with our bodies, what percentage do you think would answer, “I am happy with how my body looks?”

Research done about body image shows that women are much more critical of their appearance than men. They are much less likely to like what they see in the mirror. Eight out of ten women will be dissatisfied with their reflection, and more than half may see a distorted image.* Young women need more self-confidence and self-esteem in themselves…………

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In the same vein of helping teens with self-image, Dr Nancy Brown  discusses  Teen Girls And The “How I Look Journal” over at Better Health.

The How I Look Journal was designed for middle school girls in 2007 (revised in 2009), and has been used primarily in group settings, although girls can use it by themselves. Counselors and therapists tend to use the topics as a basis for discussions and teachers prefer using the journal in lesson formats. There is also a companion journal (2009) for mothers called “How I Look at my Daughter, Her World, and Her Future.”

Given I had the week off I decided to review the copies I was sent and am delighted to say that my teenage daughters and I thought the journals are a great idea. The journal prompts help girls identify and celebrate their inner strengths and attributes, manage stress, accept their bodies and dream!……….

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Dr Charles on how our skin care products can affect the environment:  Exfoliating Soap is Full of Plastic. Seriously.  (photo credit)

I’ve been buying, using, and recommending Dove Exfoliating Soap as an affordable and low maintenance facial cleanser. Doctor-recommended. In general my skin has liked the stuff. But a friend recently made me aware of the fact that most of these mass-produced exfoliating soaps contain “microbeads” of plastic. These tiny globules of polyethylene act as a gentle abrasive that exfoliates dead skin, but the synthetic grit then washes down our drains and into our watersheds and oceans where it accumulates, gets eaten by sea creatures, and damages our ecosystems. Plastic beads, made from petroleum products, in my soap. Really?…….

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H/T to @staticnrg who tweeted an announcement regarding her new blog, 365 days with Cushing’s Disease.  It will be interesting following and learning from her.

Inspired by other "365 days in pictures" bloggers, I thought I'd try it. I may fizzle out, but I started: http://bit.ly/8Gbu7Z  

Along the same lines:  100 Inspiring Blogs for People Affected by Chronic Illness

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The Dr Anonymous’ show  for this Thursday night has been canceled, but there will be one Saturday night at 9 pm ET.   

You may want to listen to the shows in his Archives.   Here are some to get you started:

GruntDoc, Sid Schwab, Dr. Val, Kevin MD, Rural Doctoring, Emergiblog, Crzegrl, Dr. Wes, TBTAM, Gwenn O'Keeffe, Bongi, Paul Levy, John Halamka, and ScanMan

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