Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Shout Outs

FDAzilla blog is the host for this week’s Grand Rounds!   You can read this week’s edition here.

When when I read the posts from this week’s grand rounds, I am astounded at how advanced, how intense, how personal, how vast, and also how amazingly complicated health care here in America is.  It’s so complicated that probably only the most astute health care observers will even understand every post below.

As you read through the best posts from the medical blogosphere for the week, just think about how amazing all of this is -  health care leads to all kinds of misconceptions, frustrations, discoveries, inspiration, opportunities, tragedy, and humor. …………

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Kim, Emergiblog, is the host of the latest edition of Change of Shift (Vol 5, No 14)! You can find the schedule and the COS archives at Emergiblog. (photo credit)

Happy New Year!

Welcome to the first 2011 edition of Change of Shift, the bi-weekly nursing blog carnival!

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Let’s get started!

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This is so the Editor’s Pick of the new year! The Muse, RN reminds us that there is …No “I” in “Team”, and believe me, it’s not what you think!!!  …..

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Need any good reading material?  Here are some suggestions from fellow bloggers:

Dr. Marya Zilberberg, Heathcare, etcRadium, dopamine and innovation: Name your poison

Reading Deborah Blum's "The Poisoner's Handbook" is an intellectual treat. Although non-fiction, it paints in understated sepia tones the crevices of New York City at the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, where bootlegged booze and poisons were fare of the day, homicides went unpunished and the corrupt coroner system basked in the glow of its own willful ignorance and political approval. ……..

Fizzy, Mothers in Medicine:  Doctor chick lit?

…….  I'm mildly embarrassed to admit it, but I LOVE chick lit. I don't know why, because I hate fashion and flowers and jewelry and everything else girly. But I love these books….. .

……..I recently discovered a list of the ultimate top 100 chick lit novels and noting that I've already read and enjoyed 7 of the top 10, I've decided to make it my mission for 2011 to work my way through the list. Come on, who's with me?

Gizabeth Shyder, Methodical MadnessAbsence Makes the Heart Grow Fonder

……Yup, absence really does make the heart grow fonder. I missed the hell out of my kids last week and was glad to have four books (I recommend Little Bee by Chris Cleave, Inherent Vice by Thomas Pynchon, and Homer and Langley by E.L. Doctorow - and I won't mention the other because if you don't have anything nice to say don't say it, right???) to read at night and lots of work to keep me busy all week and weekend. ……

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A couple of funny posts of kids making up new words ---

From Dino DocWord of the Day

From TBTAMThe “B” Word

A friend of mine was teaching her 4 year old daughter the nuances of feminine hygiene the other day. Here’s how it went down …….  

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I’ve received a few thank you notes from patients, but never as cool as this one Impacted ED Nurse received:  setting a new standard in thank you cards

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Via tweeter:  fnyc @precordialthump via @antidoped Cool way to practice or teach intraosseous cannulation http://tinyurl.com/crunchie-bone

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Via tweeter @MedicalNews Down the Hatch and Straight Into Medical History http://nyti.ms/fgDhLO

…… But Dr. Chevalier Jackson went much further than most.

A laryngologist who worked in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, he preserved more than 2,000 objects that people had swallowed or inhaled: nails and bolts, miniature binoculars, a radiator key, a child’s perfect-attendance pin, a medallion that says “Carry me for good luck.”

Jackson retrieved these objects from people’s upper torsos, generally with little or no anesthesia. He was so intent on assembling his collection that he once refused to return a swallowed quarter, …….

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Threads has a nice tutorial article:  Weave a Celtic Knot (photo credit)

One day while browsing in a fabric store, I came across an appealing piece of English trim made from charmeuse bias tubes laid out in a design reminiscent of interlaced Celtic patterns. I decided to use this technique to make embellishment pieces for cuffs, collars, and pockets starting with Celtic designs from clip art. It’s not that complicated, as long as you get your work mapped out initially. I will show you how.  …….

1 comment:

Gizabeth Shyder said...

Thanks for the Shout, Ramona! I love the thank you card. In path, we don't have enough patient interaction to get those.