Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Shout Outs

Enabling Healthy Decisions is the host for this week’s Grand Rounds! You can read this week’s edition here.

The concept of “engagement” in healthcare is a difficult one. Traditionally, we’ve had a build it and they will come approach that didn’t encourage preventative care. It also didn’t openly acknowledge the challenges that consumers have in dealing with medication adherence and even understanding the system or their physician’s instructions.

In this week’s edition of Grand Rounds, I looked at submissions and recent posts from several angles on this issue.

One of the most engaging was from the healthAGEnda blog where Amy tells her personal story about being diagnosed with Stage IV inflammatory breast cancer and trying to work though the system. Her focus on patient-centered care and support for the Campaign for Better Care make you want to jump out of your seat and shake the physician she talks about.

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A beautiful post from Dr. Bruce Campbell, Reflections in a Head Mirror: Non-Frail

……….Finally, the big question emerged. The daughter took a breath. “Do you really think he could survive a big surgery, Doctor? After all, Dad is 90.”

Their eyes swung toward me. Here was a man who looked a lot younger than the calendar would predict. He still gets outside and walks every day and is fully engaged with his world. But, true enough, he has lived a very long time. …………….

As I opened the door to leave, he stopped me. “Doctor, I realize that I can have the surgery. Thanks for that. I trust you. But, Doctor,” he paused, “should I have the surgery? I am 90-years-old, after all!”

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It’s time for MedGadget’s Medical Blog Awards -- 2010 Medical Weblog Awards!

This marks the 7th year of the competition. This year's competition is sponsored by Epocrates® and Lenovo. (photo credit)

The categories for this year's awards are:

  • Best Medical Weblog
  • Best New Medical Weblog (established in 2010)
  • Best Literary Medical Weblog
  • Best Clinical Sciences Weblog
  • Best Health Policies/Ethics Weblog
  • Best Medical Technologies/Informatics Weblog
  • Best Patient's Blog
  • Nominations are now accepted in the comments section of this post. When nominating, please indicate the blog's name and URL, nominating category, as well as your thoughts why this particular blog deserves recognition.

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    Via tweeter: RT @EvidenceMatters: rt @MishaAngrist Sugar on the floor NY Historical Society's exhibit on the discovery of insulin. http://bit.ly/ht7WfY

    Yesterday I went to the New York Historical Society’s exhibit Breakthrough: The Dramatic Story of the Discovery of Insulin (through January 31; $12 for adult non-members). I know–the title is breathless and leads the witness. But forgive the curators. The “drama” was certainly real, but that’s not what I found most compelling. I was struck by ………

    (photo credit NY Historic Society online from Eli Lilly and Company Archives)

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    Another via tweeter, this one from @krupali: Cyberspace When You’re Dead - http://nyti.ms/dQGoiG

    Suppose that just after you finish reading this article, you keel over, dead. Perhaps you’re ready for such an eventuality, in that you have prepared a will or made some sort of arrangement for the fate of the worldly goods you leave behind ………..

    This has inspired a variety of entrepreneurs to place bets that, eventually, people will want control over the afterlife of their digital selves. ……. Legacy Locker claims “around 10,000” people have signed up for its digital-estate-management service. Its rivals include DataInherit, a service of DSwiss, “the Swiss bank for information assets” (you can even update your digital-legacy data via its iPhone app), and Entrustet, of Madison, Wis. Last May these three firms sponsored Digital Death Day, an event tacked on to an annual online-identity conference near San Francisco. ……………

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    From Wachter’s World: The New Home Team: The Remarkable Rise of the Hyphenated Hospitalist

    I recall with fondness many meetings in 1996-98, when the hospitalist field was still in its infancy. We had invented a new medical specialty, and our gatherings were vibrant and purposeful. We were determined to remake the healthcare system, learn from each other’s triumphs and disasters, and chart a course that would improve the care of hospitalized patients. These were heady times.

    I experienced déjà vu last week …... Representing the “traditional” hospitalist field (I never thought I’d say that) were …., and me. …. But the real stars were six leading physicians in new subspecialty hospitalist fields: a neurohospitalist (Dave Likosky), two surgical hospitalists (John Maa and Leon Owens), two ob-gyn hospitalists (Rob Olson and Ken Jacobs), and even an ENT hospitalist, Matt Russell. Here’s what I learned: …….

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    Via @Doctor_V who tweeted “The End of Internal Medicine as we Know It - hard look at ACOs http://bit.ly/eZXswC

    Physicians have doubtless been issuing jeremiads since before Jeremiah. We are overworked, underpaid, and underappreciated.

    But today, general internists have a real problem. And it is our leaders who do this to us. As summarized in the Annals of Internal Medicine: ……..

    In the future envisioned by the health policy community, including the leadership of the Amercian College of Physicians and the American Medical Association, patients who want a personal physician, someone they know and trust, who understands and cares about them as individuals will have to pay extra for “concierge” care. Everyone else will migrate to team care from large “Accountable Care Oranizations” (accountable to whom, one may ask—certainly not the patients) …………..

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    From twitter: @matthewbrowning: RT @DaphneLeigh: Beautiful images of DNA. Must watch this one, via @HealthIsSocial. http://bit.ly/e5421P

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    The Folk Art Museum in New York has two quilt related exhibit currently on display. Many of the quilts can been seen online (just follow the links).

    Quilts: Masterworks from the American Folk Art Museum” can be seen through April 24, 2011.

    Quilts: Super Stars from the American Folk Art Museum” can be seen through September 25, 2011 at the Lincoln Square branch.

    Coming May 25-30, 2011 is an exhibit of more than 650 red and white American quilts, all of which are on loan from one private New York City collection -- Infinite Variety: Three Centuries of Red and White Quilts.

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    From Erin Gilday's Patchwork Underground comes a wonderful tutorial: Vintage in Detail: Cutwork (photo credit)

    Cutwork is one of the sexiest vintage details out there. It’s also the brainchild of nuns. Go figure. ……..

    Though it looks really tricky, cutwork isn’t all that difficult to do. Though you can use a satin stitch on your zigzag machine to complete the outlines or even go nuts with your computerized embroidery machine, the directions below are for doing it the old-fashioned way – by hand! ……….

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